Geographies of Resistance: Art, Research and Labor Struggle

On Thursday, April 4th, at 7.30 pm, the Center for Global Workers’ Rights inaugurated the art exhibition “Geographies of Resistance: Art, Research and Labor Struggle,” curated by Postdoctoral Scholar Paolo Marinaro in the Lobby of the Keller Building.
Geographies of Resistance: Art, Research and Labor Struggle

Postdoctoral Scholar Paolo Marinaro provides a tour of the art expo.

by Paolo Marinaro

On Thursday, April 4th, at 7.30 pm, the Center for Global Workers’ Rights inaugurated the art exhibition “Geographies of Resistance: Art, Research and Labor Struggle,” curated by Postdoctoral Scholar Paolo Marinaro in the Lobby of the Keller Building. The art expo presented a dynamic group of artists, activists and labor scholars who collaborated to trace geographies of resistance and vulnerabilities of workers and labor movements within the North American Free Trade Zone (NAFTA). The project bridged art, research and activism by looking at the intersection of class, gender and race in the global economy.

Conceptual art, documentary photography and ethnographic records depicted experiences of workers in Mexico, Canada and the U.S., with particular attention to migration, gender and labor struggles in strategic sites: Mexico City and New York City, and the borders between them. Fred Lonidier and Javier Dragustinovis focused on the experiences of workers in the global factories along the U.S. Mexico border. David Bacon, Carole Condé and Karl Beverdige presented works produced in collaboration with Mexican and Central American farmworkers. The Scylla Art Collective featured a project on the unionization of food delivery app workers in Mexico City. The Workers Art Coalition NYC, introduced a collection of zines centering on workers’ reflective histories of their own lives. The Workers Studio by Sol Aramendi presented collaborations with the LGBTQ group Lunicorns from Staten Island, Jornaler@ and domestic workers cooperative Adikhaar. Geographies of Resistance urges us to reflect upon the arts as a collaborative process and an organizing tool to see the potential for alternative forms of solidarity.