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Program Requirements

MS in HRER Program Requirements

Total Required Credits for the MS: 37 credits at the 400 level or higher; at least 18 must be at the 500 or 800 level and at least 6 of those must be at the 500 level.

Core Courses (22 credits)

HRER 501(3), HRER 502(3), HRER 504(3), HRER 505(3), HRER 510(1), HRER 512(3), HRER 513(3), HRER 516(3)

Required course are offered once per academic year and elective courses at least once every two academic years.

Emphasis Courses (6 credits)

An emphasis is an area of study related to a particular aspect or domain of labor, employment relations, or human resources. Students select an emphasis in consultation with their faculty advisor.

Elective Courses (3-9 credits)

With the faculty advisor's approval, a student selects at least 3 or more elective credits, depending on the chosen option. Suitable elective courses include, but are not limited tov: HRER 500, HRER 535, HRER 536, HRER 594, HRER 595, HRER 596, HRER 599; LER 411, LER 401, LER 444, LER 458Y; ECON 412, ECON 436W, ECON 571; EDLDR 565, EDLDR 574; HIST (LER) 555; MGMT 321, MGMT 523, MGMT 548; PSYCH 484, PSYCH 485, PSY 522; SOC 455, SOC 456, SOC 555.

SARI Program

The SARI program is designed to offer graduate students comprehensive, multilevel training in the responsible conduct of research, in a way that is tailored to address the issues faced by individual disciplines. The program is implemented by PSU colleges and graduate program in a way that meets the particular needs of students in each unit. In general, SARI programs have two parts: an online program to be completed in the first year of graduate study; to be followed by five hours of discussion-based RCR education prior to degree completion.

The Scholarship and Research Integrity (SARI) program was launched in fall 2009 to provide graduate students with opportunities to identify, examine, and discuss ethical issues relevant to their disciplines. Several thousand students participated the first year, and ultimately every student receiving a master’s or doctoral degree from Penn State will have participated in this training.

The SARI@PSU program at Penn State utilizes online courses offered through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program. Graduate Students can visit http://citi.psu.edu/ to complete the SARI requirement.

Participants who have successfully completed a CITI course (with a grade of 80% or higher) will receive a certificate at the end of the course. Please print your certificate to give to your Graduate Staff Assistant, Erin Hetzel, eab27@psu.edu.

THESIS OPTION:

The HRER thesis option is intended for students anticipating additional graduate education beyond the master's degree. It requires 37 credits, including a minimum of 30 at the 400 and 500 level, and a minimum of 6 600-level thesis credits. For the degree, an overall 3.00 (B) grade-point average must be earned in the 400- and 500-level work and a grade of B or above must be earned in all 500-level courses. At least 6 credits must emphasize a particular aspect of labor, employment relations, or human resources. A student's thesis should reflect the chosen emphasis.

RESEARCH PAPER OPTION:

The HRER research paper option is intended for students expecting to enter the labor market upon completion of the master's degree. It requires a minimum of 37 credits at the 400 and 500 level. For the degree, and overall 3.00 (B) grade-point average must be earned in the 400- and 500-level work and a grade of B or above must be earned in all 500-level courses. At least 6 credits must emphasize a particular aspect of labor, employment relations, or human resources. A student's research paper should reflect the chosen emphasis.

Graduate courses carry numbers from 500 to 599 and 800 to 899. Advanced undergraduate are courses numbered between 400 and 499.  They may be used to meet some graduate degree requirements when taken by graduate students. Courses below the 400 level may not. A graduate student may register for or audit these courses in order to make up deficiencies or to fill in gaps in previous education but not to meet requirements for an advanced degree.